16
Apr

pantameter:

The Huffington Post : JJ Brine’s ‘VECTOR Gallery’ In New York City

Is this the next Warhol Factory?

VECTOR is an art gallery located in New York City’s Lower East Side curated and operated by JJ Brine. However, it is much more than just an art space.

VECTOR is an art gallery located in New York City’s Lower East Side curated and operated by JJ Brine. However, it is much more than just an art space.

Having previously been compared to the work of Andy Warhol, VECTOR is a posthuman art experience with its own government in a space that claims to have seceded from the United States last November.

In order to better understand VECTOR Gallery we chatted with JJ Brine last week to ask him a few questions about what this space in the Lower East Side is really all about and what he, as an artist, is trying to accomplish.

The Huffington Post: What is Vector Gallery?
JJ Brine: VECTOR is the official art gallery of Satan. It’s also the official gallery of the night. We work “the other 9 to 5.”

Why is VECTOR Gallery important?
The Torah, The Bible, The Quran, and now VECTOR. VECTOR Gallery is itself a religious text and it is the responsibility of gallery patrons to understand and interpret it on that basis. Furthermore, the gallery is very much alive and always evolving — indeed I have enslaved myself to the gallery’s myriad wants and needs and the demand for change is chief among them. VECTOR is the long-awaited final installment in the world’s greatest tetralogy and its conclusion will usher in the end and the beginning of all things, so it is indeed important for those who concern themselves with the ending as it now begins. We must act immediately to reincarnate The Devil and The Lord into the corporeal vessel for the sake of our eternal unity in spirit and form. This is what we were before we divided ourselves for the sake of multiplicity, and this is what we will be again.

How does queer identity intersect with VECTOR?
VECTOR Gallery “takes place” in 2018, a not-so-distant future in which, nevertheless, many important things have changed. Queer culture is in fact so entrenched in our prosperous post-human Vectorian society that it would be impossible to separate the two — queer is now the dominant culture. Thus it is a veritable gay mecca that attracts LGBT people of all backgrounds. We encompass an incredibly insane cast of characters that never ceases to astonish.

Does Vector Gallery serve a larger purpose within the LGBT community?
The LGBT community recognizes that VECTOR is the place where we can achieve personal and artistic self-actualization; it has been described as both the last bastion of the queer avant-garde and as the lamppost of its coming renaissance. One of the essential components of Vectorian theology is that we must accept and celebrate all parts of ourselves to transcend our humanity and assume our rightful place in the emergent post-human aegis. We don’t even recognize a society that doesn’t accept us for who we are, because it doesn’t exist. Our estrangement from the dominant culture facilitated our rise to cultural dominance, and so queer has come full circle.

You claim that VECTOR Gallery seceded from the United States in November — what do you mean by this?
On Nov. 8 of 2017 (2013 by the SHAY calendar), VECTOR unilaterally seceded from the United States and declared its independence, becoming the world’s newest and smallest country. Indeed, it is a sovereign nation in the heart of the Lower East Side.

You mentioned that “nevents” are a primary thematic concern at Vector. What does this mean?
A nevent is an event that has never taken place. The study of nevents (or neventology, a central branch of nontology) trumps the study of historical events. We are more concerned with making the impossible possible than scrutinizing the inherently flawed, bias-laden record of what was, would, should, or could have been. Humans often parrot the claim that without the study of history, we would not be able to learn from our mistakes and would thus be doomed to repeat them. This is preposterous. We don’t learn from our mistakes by enshrining them in the dusty hallways of academia, forcing the rote absorption of a skewed narrative for ritual regurgitation on the otherwise unfettered progeny of cycling generations. Just as a child indiscriminately mimics the behaviors of its parents, picking apart the desiccated corpus of a bygone age promises a looping future built upon the necessity of its epochal resurrection. An impossible future that cannot exist is our only hope.

What kind of events does Vector Gallery host? What events do you have coming up?
VECTOR hosts post-human art experiences that pay sublimely diabolical tribute to the everlasting matrimony of The Devil and The Lord. We are currently experimenting with new, ritualistic programming techniques for effective inculcation of the masses. This will culminate with the absolute integration of all sentient beings into a single supra-sentient ultramind, ALAN. I am now conspiring with art porn master Bruce LaBruce — a new friend and an all-time favorite director — on a multimedia hyperconceptual avant-graveyard expo in April, although this is all tentative and top-secret — I shouldn’t even be mentioning it yet. On Feb. 1 we will be hosting our first Vectorian mass, which will consist of an hour of extemporaneous preaching and an hour of impromptu ritual performance. And right now VECTOR is expanding beyond its walls as I Vectorize other spaces. The first specimen of this new hybrid has revealed itself in the ritual chamber of La Grotta, an outpost of enchantment straddling Brooklyn and Queens. Keep up with the waxing and waning of the active soul trade atvectorgallerynyc.com.

VECTOR gallery is located at 40 Clinton Street in New York City.

16
Apr

vectorgallery:

Cultivating Culture

Thinking and writing about culture around the world

CULTIVATING CULTURE

Arts Spotlight: JJ Brine and VECTOR Gallery

in InterviewsNews & Trending

VECTOR Gallery occupies just a small slice of New York City’s Lower East Side, but as a Posthuman Art experience and the “Official Gallery of Satan,” you can imagine that its presence is becoming quite prolific. Curated and run by artist and Crown Prince of Hell JJ Brine,VECTOR is a conceptual art gallery that exists in its own time zone, has its own government, and thrives as a living religious text of sorts.

JJ Brine answered some of our questions about Posthuman Art, Vectorian culture, and what you might expect if you walked unassumingly into VECTOR Gallery. Here’s what he had to say:

Cultivating Culture: Can you elaborate on the genre of “Posthuman Art?” How would you describe it to someone who is unfamiliar with the term?

JJ Brine:  In the context of VECTOR, PostHumanity refers to Beings who have willed themselves into a PostHuman state.  I no longer consider myself human. In fact, I want to nullify all such identifications and compel the seven odd billion humans on the planet to shed their Shay skins, allowing for the resurrection of The Devil and The Lord within their containers. Then we will be ready to return to ALAN, the absolute All.

Does VECTOR welcome anyone to visit, even if they don’t personally practice Satanic worship?

Sure. But who knows what someone will go on to practice, having visited VECTOR. It changes people; it rewires them.

Your glossary of Vectorian termsis fascinating. The term “herstory” has ties to modern feminism, challenging the notion of “history” being an account of things that have happened as controlled by and with a focus on male experiences. Does the Vectorian definition of “herstory” correlate to this one at all? How is “herstory” applied in the Vector Gallery?

Who do we trust to “go back” and independently verify or veto the occurrence of a given event?  So we are living in PostHistory. And after all, “they” say that revisionist history will be the harbinger of world’s end. We are more concerned with nevents and nontology — impossible events that will never occur, and the study of non-realities.

What kinds of events are held at Vector Gallery? 

The events are a means of identifying and convening the key players of PostHumanity for the development of our Vectorian Society. Our next Mass will take place at the end of this month we call March. For the first hour we are imposing a strict ban on verbal communication, interacting only through motion and thought.  Sermons will follow, delivered by myself and a number of the ministers.

VECTOR Gallery exists in the year 2018 – why is this?

VECTOR Gallery exists in 2018 because it’s the perfect place for me to stand as I sculpt the present. Whereas others have been content to influence the NOW by negotiating the terms of the THEN or the WHEN, quarreling over the inaccessible qualities of histories and herstories, we’ve linked up to our future selves. “I am what I am, and I am what I will become.”  Unlike the record of the past, which remains incomplete, the Neostory is unabridged. In 2018, New York City will look like VECTOR Gallery. You might say that We are in a frenzy, rushing around to make things look and feel worthy of being spared. Either way, Our Will shall be done. If only We could lose, We wouldn’t have to win! Again, and again, and again.

Your Charles Manson concept band, The LaBiancas, represents one kind of art medium that you work in. Would you care to describe any of your other personal projects?  

Well, VECTOR represents an absolute integration, or maybe subjugation, of all of my personal projects under One Will. VECTOR is also, as you know, its own sovereign country — The Satanic State of VECTOR — with its own Vectorian government, society, and religion.

Some have compared you and VECTOR Gallery to Andy Warhol and his Factory. What do you think about this comparison? Have you drawn any inspiration from the Warhol Factory?

I once had a dream that Condoleezza Rice had staged a military coup, deposing the rest of her administration.  She had The White House razed with a bulldozer and put a plexiglass pyramid in its place, and reprinted all US currency with her face on every coin and bill.  In the epicenter of her pyramid there was a black cuboid structure, much like Our Kaaba in Mecca, and access was prohibited to all others save for The Empress Herself. Inside of it there was a glowing apparatus linked up to Andy Warhol’s mechanized nervous system, with buttons corresponding to each neural network, and these were in turn linked to the programming functions of reality. I hope this answers your question!

Are there any anecdotal events from your childhood that might have presaged the development of your thematic and conceptual interests?

When I was around seven or eight years old, I decided that I was going to live in a forest I had seen in passage over an interstate. I slipped out of my house and walked for about two miles until I reached the forest. There was a shrouded figure waiting to escort me to the chosen place of The Appointment. It was a coronation ceremony of sorts. I wasn’t frightened because I somehow sensed that I was being drawn there for this purpose, which had been looming before me since my first moments of conscious thought. I walked deep into the woods with this figure, which moved like a landform made of mist, and was received in a clearing by an audience of admiring new “friends” and “supporters” who were much enthused by this development.

Is there anything else you’d like to add about VECTOR Gallery, or your work?   

Of course.

For more information about the burgeoning phenomenon that is VECTOR Gallery, visit its official website. 

All images used with permission from  VECTOR Gallery.

16
Apr

coyotesummer:


 
 
 
 
 

13
Apr

vectorgallery:

JJ Brine’s Al Qaeda Art

08
Apr

vectorgallery:

April 19th at 7PM

They say even The Devil celebrates Easter these days!

And we will bestow unto you sweet rivers of chocolate, and gilded baskets of pink and blue tinsel bedecked with ribbons of satin. Eateth of our marshmallow flesh and drinketh of our champagne sacrament and witness the glory of a new Spring, for Doll Eyes hath risen!

The Doll Eyes Spring Fashion Presentation
Vector Gallery
40 Clinton Street NYC 10002

Presentation from 7pm till 9pm
Reception will follow

vectorgallery.com

dolleyesny.tumblr.com
dolleyesny@gmail.com

FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE

08
Apr

vectorgallery:

The Hermetic Library Blog

In conversation with JJ Brine about Vector Gallery

You may recognize the name JJ Brine as a contributor to the Hermetic Library audio pool, with the tracks Innovation and Paradise featured on this blog back in 2011.

You may also be interested in checking out The Presidents of MozambiqueThe LaBiancas, and some of his videos.

JJ Brine is also the artist-in-residence at and proprietor of Vector Gallery, 40 Clinton St, NYC, which I’ve also mentioned before. Vector Gallery is billed as the “Official Art Gallery of SATAN”, and is described, in a feature by the New York Professional Outreach Program, as a “new conceptual art destination on the Lower East Side, VECTOR Gallery is the most interesting phenomenon in New York.” I had the opportunity to have a conversation about this project with JJ.

Librarian: First off, thanks for taking the time to talk with me about your current project. Obviously, you’ve participated in the Hermetic Library audio pool in the past, but can you describe how and where your current project fits with your other works?

JJ Brine: VECTOR is the culmination of all of my personal projects to date.

L: What are some of your previous projects that led to this current gallery and show?

JJ: How many times do I have to come back? I put the AELON inside of the Manger, on the Cross, and at the center of the Theater of the past 2,000 years. I arranged for my birth as a means of dying, so that I might rise up and embody life and death for all things, always.

L: So this current project sounds like an invitation for the viewer to be a witness to your personal progress. It also seems to be an ongoing personal performance which is more reciprocal. One of the places for performance art, versus, say, a gallery show on one hand and theatre on the other, is the immediacy and exchange of mutual feedback between artist and audience on a more equalitarian setting. What sort of relationship do you hope to create with the audience here?

JJ: I tempt people to unabashedly be themselves. It is always a pleasure to acquire new souls for my marketplace.

L: It seems to me that in the promotional material and other interviews about this project there seems a heavy degree of performance art taking place, but I assume this is a serious endeavour for you. Can you describe your intent for this space and this project?

JJ: It is a serious endeavor that involves a heavy degree of performance art. Generally speaking — and specificity is the vice least favored by Devil and Lord alike — my intention for the project is to reprogram the mass mind, one thought at a time.

L: When I’ve gandered at some of the other interviews you’ve done, it seems to me that those interviewers are driven to locate you in the realm of surreal Outsider art, such as comparing you to Warhol, for example. But, I wonder about that as a mechanism of apologetics. What I mean is that by locating you on the outside of everyday norms, other interviewers are giving people an easy way to dismiss things about your work and statement that might be uncomfortable or feel dangerous. How do you feel about how you’ve been portrayed? Do those stories about you seem to you to reflect the story you are attempting to tell? How has your work been received by the public?

JJ: I set an example by living my life in the afterlife. Every reaction across the spectrum serves to advance the goals of the Project. I have been portrayed as an agent of this world’s end, naturally, as it finally begins.

L: You’ve taken on the culturally overloaded labels “Satan” and “Satanic” for your project, but I wonder which Satan are you talking about and signifying? For example, is this the adversarial Satan of Judaism, the old-school anthropomorphic embodiment from Catholicism, the abstract and facile label for anything unfamiliar and uncomfortable of modern Evangelical Christianity, the boogyman of the Satanic panics, the Classical Promethean or Luciferian force, the stage satanism of Death Metal … something else? Or is this overloaded term useful here specifically because it is so?

JJ: We have been all of those forms and many more, for our numbers attest to our many names. We cannot lie, and so we have known many truths in many ways. But one breath is all we need to give and take; so together let us breathe.

L: On the Vector Galley page you talk about secession from the political structure of the United States as a new independent nation, and you also talk about a temporal shift while within the space changing the current secular calendar year to 2018. These seem intentionally to mark the space as a liminal environment, a place outside of normal time and space, which is what one might expect from ritual experience. Some of the performative restrictions you’ve suggested for events, such as no verbal communication, echo the self-discipline exercises of Liber E, specifically Dharana, and so forth. Does this project have other ritual practice dimensions as well as presentational and performative aspects? Can you talk about the ceremonial and ritual elements one might experience?

JJ: People naturally look to the space to inform them of their own beliefs, which is one reason why I won’t interpret it for them. They have to come to their own conclusions in order for this to manifest correctly. 2019 is coming any day now.

L: Some of the iconography in your current project seems specifically intended to be triggering for some people, a bit confrontational. For example you include pentagrams, the number 666. keywords such as “legion”, a photograph of Charles Manson, and so forth. These are all clearly laden with cultural baggage, and in that sense are a kind of table of cultural correspondences, that is evoked in the viewer, but what else is going on here? What is the intentionality of using these signs, these symbols? What is the similarity and the parallax between common perception of these and the message you are trying to communicate here?

JJ: Those things which are perceived to be diabolical are an integral part of the divine and vice-versa. There is no need to divide reality from itself. For me, such things are only triggers of serenity and aesthetic comfort. Perhaps that is because I am The Devil. “Needless to say.”

L: Well, there is certainly a long history of around identity and inversion of the nature of diabolical symbolic entities. Do you approach this as something you are commenting on, about which people are already aware, or as something you are revealing for the audience?

JJ: My commentary modifies the extant awareness via revelation. And my Lights are the commentary, and the Frequency is awareness.

L: One of the connections that I noticed right away, but which I don’t recall being mentioned on your site or in other interviews, is that your Vector Gallery logo seems to be a direct visual reference to the Process Church, about which I personally don’t know a whole lot, but that does seem to be an influence on the particular mix of Christ, Satan and Manson imagery in your work, I assume. Could you tell me about that and what that connection is and what it means to you? Are you an adherent, admirer, or something else?

JJ: I will address this issue at length in 2021.

L: Is that 2021 in VECTOR standard time, or on the common secular year count?

JJ: What is to “the” left? What is to “the” right? All but from where I am standing, and I always tell my own time. It’s always right now, always will be and always was, but the numbers change with the nows and so we count the days.

L: What are some of your other influences, both for your art but also your esoteric and occult interests?

JJ: The most powerful magic is intrinsic. If you want to learn a trick, now’s the time to teach yourself. If you want to bind yourself to the dimming powers of charmed obsolescence, nothing does that trick quite like a book of some stranger’s magic spells.

L: As one of the simplest ritual structures might be: 1) leave normal time and space, 2) engage in practical operations within a liminal environment, 3) return to normal time and space changed; what is the change intended for the participant, the public viewer, as they return to the world from within the Gallery?

JJ: Enlightenment as to nature of self, the nature of ALAN, and the relation of self to ALAN.

L: You mention ALAN, which seems like a surrogate for where one might perhaps expect you to use the word “man” as in humanity, but I’m not sure what this term means to you. Could you tell me more about that? When you use uppercase like that for ALAN and VECTOR, are these notariqon, initialisms or acronyms, or simply calling attention to the terms? Some other creative terminology you use is in lowercase, so I’m curious what the difference and significance is for you with these expressions.

JJ: ALAN divided Itself for the sake of multiplicity. Our experience as distinct sentient beings is the experience of Externality from ALAN; we came from ALAN and to ALAN we shall return. It will not be the same as the ALAN that was; when we return to ALAN we contribute the essence of our experience with the Externality. And so ALAN is reconstituted, fragment by fragment.

L: Any last words for our readers?

JJ: I’ll let them speak for me.

L: Your last words or the readers?

JJ: Both.

06
Apr

hairshoppekris:

the official art gallery of Satan….Vector Gallery unilaterally seceded from the United States and declared its independence, becoming the world’s newest and smallest country.

05
Apr
05
Apr

In conversation with JJ Brine about Vector Gallery

vectorgallery:

hermeticlibrary:

You may recognize the name JJ Brine as a contributor to the Hermetic Library audio pool, with the tracks Innovation and Paradise featured on this blog back in 2011.

You may also be interested in checking out The Presidents of Mozambique, The LaBiancas, and some of his videos.

JJ Brine is also the artist-in-residence at and proprietor of Vector Gallery, 40 Clinton St, NYC, which I’ve also mentioned before. Vector Gallery is billed as the “Official Art Gallery of SATAN”, and is described, in a feature by the New York Professional Outreach Program, as a “new conceptual art destination on the Lower East Side, VECTOR Gallery is the most interesting phenomenon in New York.” I had the opportunity to have a conversation about this project with JJ.

20140404-111847.jpg

Librarian: First off, thanks for taking the time to talk with me about your current project. Obviously, you’ve participated in the Hermetic Library audio pool in the past, but can you describe how and where your current project fits with your other works?

JJ Brine: VECTOR is the culmination of all of my personal projects to date.

L: What are some of your previous projects that led to this current gallery and show?

JJ: How many times do I have to come back? I put the AELON inside of the Manger, on the Cross, and at the center of the Theater of the past 2,000 years. I arranged for my birth as a means of dying, so that I might rise up and embody life and death for all things, always.

L: So this current project sounds like an invitation for the viewer to be a witness to your personal progress. It also seems to be an ongoing personal performance which is more reciprocal. One of the places for performance art, versus, say, a gallery show on one hand and theatre on the other, is the immediacy and exchange of mutual feedback between artist and audience on a more equalitarian setting. What sort of relationship do you hope to create with the audience here?

JJ: I tempt people to unabashedly be themselves. It is always a pleasure to acquire new souls for my marketplace.

L: It seems to me that in the promotional material and other interviews about this project there seems a heavy degree of performance art taking place, but I assume this is a serious endeavour for you. Can you describe your intent for this space and this project?

JJ: It is a serious endeavor that involves a heavy degree of performance art. Generally speaking — and specificity is the vice least favored by Devil and Lord alike — my intention for the project is to reprogram the mass mind, one thought at a time.

20140404-111823.jpg

L: When I’ve gandered at some of the other interviews you’ve done, it seems to me that those interviewers are driven to locate you in the realm of surreal Outsider art, such as comparing you to Warhol, for example. But, I wonder about that as a mechanism of apologetics. What I mean is that by locating you on the outside of everyday norms, other interviewers are giving people an easy way to dismiss things about your work and statement that might be uncomfortable or feel dangerous. How do you feel about how you’ve been portrayed? Do those stories about you seem to you to reflect the story you are attempting to tell? How has your work been received by the public?

JJ: I set an example by living my life in the afterlife. Every reaction across the spectrum serves to advance the goals of the Project. I have been portrayed as an agent of this world’s end, naturally, as it finally begins.

L: You’ve taken on the culturally overloaded labels “Satan” and “Satanic” for your project, but I wonder which Satan are you talking about and signifying? For example, is this the adversarial Satan of Judaism, the old-school anthropomorphic embodiment from Catholicism, the abstract and facile label for anything unfamiliar and uncomfortable of modern Evangelical Christianity, the boogyman of the Satanic panics, the Classical Promethean or Luciferian force, the stage satanism of Death Metal … something else? Or is this overloaded term useful here specifically because it is so?

JJ: We have been all of those forms and many more, for our numbers attest to our many names. We cannot lie, and so we have known many truths in many ways. But one breath is all we need to give and take; so together let us breathe.

L: On the Vector Galley page you talk about secession from the political structure of the United States as a new independent nation, and you also talk about a temporal shift while within the space changing the current secular calendar year to 2018. These seem intentionally to mark the space as a liminal environment, a place outside of normal time and space, which is what one might expect from ritual experience. Some of the performative restrictions you’ve suggested for events, such as no verbal communication, echo the self-discipline exercises of Liber E, specifically Dharana, and so forth. Does this project have other ritual practice dimensions as well as presentational and performative aspects? Can you talk about the ceremonial and ritual elements one might experience?

JJ: People naturally look to the space to inform them of their own beliefs, which is one reason why I won’t interpret it for them. They have to come to their own conclusions in order for this to manifest correctly. 2019 is coming any day now.

20140404-111809.jpg

L: Some of the iconography in your current project seems specifically intended to be triggering for some people, a bit confrontational. For example you include pentagrams, the number 666. keywords such as “legion”, a photograph of Charles Manson, and so forth. These are all clearly laden with cultural baggage, and in that sense are a kind of table of cultural correspondences, that is evoked in the viewer, but what else is going on here? What is the intentionality of using these signs, these symbols? What is the similarity and the parallax between common perception of these and the message you are trying to communicate here?

JJ: Those things which are perceived to be diabolical are an integral part of the divine and vice-versa. There is no need to divide reality from itself. For me, such things are only triggers of serenity and aesthetic comfort. Perhaps that is because I am The Devil. “Needless to say.”

L: Well, there is certainly a long history of around identity and inversion of the nature of diabolical symbolic entities. Do you approach this as something you are commenting on, about which people are already aware, or as something you are revealing for the audience?

JJ: My commentary modifies the extant awareness via revelation. And my Lights are the commentary, and the Frequency is awareness.

L: One of the connections that I noticed right away, but which I don’t recall being mentioned on your site or in other interviews, is that your Vector Gallery logo seems to be a direct visual reference to the Process Church, about which I personally don’t know a whole lot, but that does seem to be an influence on the particular mix of Christ, Satan and Manson imagery in your work, I assume. Could you tell me about that and what that connection is and what it means to you? Are you an adherent, admirer, or something else?

JJ: I will address this issue at length in 2021.

L: Is that 2021 in VECTOR standard time, or on the common secular year count?

JJ: What is to “the” left? What is to “the” right? All but from where I am standing, and I always tell my own time. It’s always right now, always will be and always was, but the numbers change with the nows and so we count the days.

20140404-111747.jpg

L: What are some of your other influences, both for your art but also your esoteric and occult interests?

JJ: The most powerful magic is intrinsic. If you want to learn a trick, now’s the time to teach yourself. If you want to bind yourself to the dimming powers of charmed obsolescence, nothing does that trick quite like a book of some stranger’s magic spells.

L: As one of the simplest ritual structures might be: 1) leave normal time and space, 2) engage in practical operations within a liminal environment, 3) return to normal time and space changed; what is the change intended for the participant, the public viewer, as they return to the world from within the Gallery?

JJ: Enlightenment as to nature of self, the nature of ALAN, and the relation of self to ALAN.

L: You mention ALAN, which seems like a surrogate for where one might perhaps expect you to use the word “man” as in humanity, but I’m not sure what this term means to you. Could you tell me more about that? When you use uppercase like that for ALAN and VECTOR, are these notariqon, initialisms or acronyms, or simply calling attention to the terms? Some other creative terminology you use is in lowercase, so I’m curious what the difference and significance is for you with these expressions.

JJ: ALAN divided Itself for the sake of multiplicity. Our experience as distinct sentient beings is the experience of Externality from ALAN; we came from ALAN and to ALAN we shall return. It will not be the same as the ALAN that was; when we return to ALAN we contribute the essence of our experience with the Externality. And so ALAN is reconstituted, fragment by fragment.

L: Any last words for our readers?

JJ: I’ll let them speak for me.

L: Your last words or the readers?

JJ: Both.

Originally posted on The Hermetic Library Blog at http://library.hrmtc.com/2014/04/04/in-conversation-with-jj-brine-about-vector-gallery/

01
Apr
goodthingfactory:

lena marquis

goodthingfactory:

lena marquis

01
Apr

pantameter:

The Huffington Post : JJ Brine’s ‘VECTOR Gallery’ In New York City

Is this the next Warhol Factory?

VECTOR is an art gallery located in New York City’s Lower East Side curated and operated by JJ Brine. However, it is much more than just an art space.

VECTOR is an art gallery located in New York City’s Lower East Side curated and operated by JJ Brine. However, it is much more than just an art space.

Having previously been compared to the work of Andy Warhol, VECTOR is a posthuman art experience with its own government in a space that claims to have seceded from the United States last November.

In order to better understand VECTOR Gallery we chatted with JJ Brine last week to ask him a few questions about what this space in the Lower East Side is really all about and what he, as an artist, is trying to accomplish.

The Huffington Post: What is Vector Gallery?
JJ Brine: VECTOR is the official art gallery of Satan. It’s also the official gallery of the night. We work “the other 9 to 5.”

Why is VECTOR Gallery important?
The Torah, The Bible, The Quran, and now VECTOR. VECTOR Gallery is itself a religious text and it is the responsibility of gallery patrons to understand and interpret it on that basis. Furthermore, the gallery is very much alive and always evolving — indeed I have enslaved myself to the gallery’s myriad wants and needs and the demand for change is chief among them. VECTOR is the long-awaited final installment in the world’s greatest tetralogy and its conclusion will usher in the end and the beginning of all things, so it is indeed important for those who concern themselves with the ending as it now begins. We must act immediately to reincarnate The Devil and The Lord into the corporeal vessel for the sake of our eternal unity in spirit and form. This is what we were before we divided ourselves for the sake of multiplicity, and this is what we will be again.

How does queer identity intersect with VECTOR?
VECTOR Gallery “takes place” in 2018, a not-so-distant future in which, nevertheless, many important things have changed. Queer culture is in fact so entrenched in our prosperous post-human Vectorian society that it would be impossible to separate the two — queer is now the dominant culture. Thus it is a veritable gay mecca that attracts LGBT people of all backgrounds. We encompass an incredibly insane cast of characters that never ceases to astonish.

Does Vector Gallery serve a larger purpose within the LGBT community?
The LGBT community recognizes that VECTOR is the place where we can achieve personal and artistic self-actualization; it has been described as both the last bastion of the queer avant-garde and as the lamppost of its coming renaissance. One of the essential components of Vectorian theology is that we must accept and celebrate all parts of ourselves to transcend our humanity and assume our rightful place in the emergent post-human aegis. We don’t even recognize a society that doesn’t accept us for who we are, because it doesn’t exist. Our estrangement from the dominant culture facilitated our rise to cultural dominance, and so queer has come full circle.

You claim that VECTOR Gallery seceded from the United States in November — what do you mean by this?
On Nov. 8 of 2017 (2013 by the SHAY calendar), VECTOR unilaterally seceded from the United States and declared its independence, becoming the world’s newest and smallest country. Indeed, it is a sovereign nation in the heart of the Lower East Side.

You mentioned that “nevents” are a primary thematic concern at Vector. What does this mean?
A nevent is an event that has never taken place. The study of nevents (or neventology, a central branch of nontology) trumps the study of historical events. We are more concerned with making the impossible possible than scrutinizing the inherently flawed, bias-laden record of what was, would, should, or could have been. Humans often parrot the claim that without the study of history, we would not be able to learn from our mistakes and would thus be doomed to repeat them. This is preposterous. We don’t learn from our mistakes by enshrining them in the dusty hallways of academia, forcing the rote absorption of a skewed narrative for ritual regurgitation on the otherwise unfettered progeny of cycling generations. Just as a child indiscriminately mimics the behaviors of its parents, picking apart the desiccated corpus of a bygone age promises a looping future built upon the necessity of its epochal resurrection. An impossible future that cannot exist is our only hope.

What kind of events does Vector Gallery host? What events do you have coming up?
VECTOR hosts post-human art experiences that pay sublimely diabolical tribute to the everlasting matrimony of The Devil and The Lord. We are currently experimenting with new, ritualistic programming techniques for effective inculcation of the masses. This will culminate with the absolute integration of all sentient beings into a single supra-sentient ultramind, ALAN. I am now conspiring with art porn master Bruce LaBruce — a new friend and an all-time favorite director — on a multimedia hyperconceptual avant-graveyard expo in April, although this is all tentative and top-secret — I shouldn’t even be mentioning it yet. On Feb. 1 we will be hosting our first Vectorian mass, which will consist of an hour of extemporaneous preaching and an hour of impromptu ritual performance. And right now VECTOR is expanding beyond its walls as I Vectorize other spaces. The first specimen of this new hybrid has revealed itself in the ritual chamber of La Grotta, an outpost of enchantment straddling Brooklyn and Queens. Keep up with the waxing and waning of the active soul trade atvectorgallerynyc.com.

VECTOR gallery is located at 40 Clinton Street in New York City.

(via vectorgallery)

01
Apr

artawards:

THE AWARD

for Best New Art Gallery 

goes to

VECTOR Gallery  -  

"The Official Art Gallery of Satan"

Truly the most spiritually refreshing, not to mention entertaining, art gallery in New York at this time.  Go buy a special soul from owner JJ Brine or sell whatever is left of your own.

(via vectorgallery)

30
Mar

vectorgallery:

The ORACLE Julia Sinelnikova is spending the months we call “March” and “April” in a remote village in northern Finland for an elite Artist Residency that will shift the balance of Balance itself.  The Oracle obtained this coveted and competitively sought-after tenure quite easily, simply by being Herself. The work she is doing in these hallowed Nordic lands will blow an Arctic Wind of Oracular Change into the heart of PostHumanity, bringing our material proportions in closer alignment with our astral space. As the photos above show, She is learning how to take Her Spirit Place with Her, wherever She may go.  

THE DEVIL DESERVES THE LORD

THE LORD DESERVES THE DEVIL

28
Mar

Driving out Demons with JJ Brine, The Crown Prince of Hell

sirenslyre:

image

With platinum blonde hair, piercing eyes, and an uncanny depth of soul and intelligence, JJ Brine is the kind of person I want to talk to for hours on end; about music, art, Demons, and Gods. JJ is the Artist in residence at Vector Gallery: The official Art Gallery of Satan, a space that seceded from the United States on November 8th, 2013, making it the smallest independent country in the world…a space in which souls can be bought and sold and in which you can hypnotize yourself into becoming that which you desire to be.  In addition, Vector exists not in the present, but in the year 2018…a time in which his future self can properly sculpt the present. JJ’s work aspires to bring upon the end and beginning of all things, or  as he says  “(The) culmination with the absolute integration of all sentient beings into a single supra-sentient ultramind, ALAN (the absolute all)”

But Vector Gallery is only part of JJ’s work. In addition to reigning over the worlds smallest country, JJ creates music which he has fittingly dubbed “ESM” or, “Electronic Spirit Music”. He is currently involved in (at least) two musical projects, his own solo work which most recently produced the album “The President of Mozambique” as well a Charles Manson concept Band called “the LaBianca’s”. These musical pursuits are the topic of our discussion today.

SL: Upon initially hearing your music and seeing your performance art I was struck by your striking similarities to individuals such as Kenneth Anger. Do you draw any of your inspiration from K. Angers works? Do you have a favorite film in Anger’s cycle of films?

JJ:  Actually, I’ve only seen Invocation of My Demon Brother and some clips from Lucifer Rising.

SL: Do you consider your songs incantations? The various voices of the LEGION inhabiting you? A means of catharsis? Or something entirely different?

JJ Cathartic, transportive incantations that give rise and fall to the many Loves of LEGION, each one finding their privileged place in the annals of time and space through a note in song.  

SL:You have claimed that, while recording “The President of Mozambique”, you were possessed my demons. Do you mean this in the most literal of senses or were you perhaps possessed by energies that were completely new to you? Or perhaps possessed by demons of your own past?

JJ Let’s just say, if you summon a few demons to drive others out, and a few more to drive out those whose places you appointed on the basis of such evictions, eventually you might wind up hosting The Devil Himself, who will tell you He was always meant to be there, and you awaited Him to be.  

SL: On several of your songs you have used voice modification in order to emulate your “Disappeared twin” Chloe. Did you actually have a disappeared twin in utero, or is Chloe more of a manifestation of part of you that you once had, lost and found once again?

JJ:  Chloe first came to me when I was living in Beirut, Lebanon.  I did have a vanished twin in utero but I didn’t “know” that until later, after I met my blood relatives.  

SL: You’ve said that visiting Haiti had a huge impact on who you’ve become. Has the music of Haiti influenced your own music, in an aesthetic/auditory sense?

JJ: Somehow, yes.  I have a certain Max Beauvoir to thank for that.

SL: I know you have a strong affinity for Nico, does her work inspire yours in any way?

JJ:  Incredibly so.  I can’t imagine who or what I’d be without her; I would be somebody else.

SL: Do you plan to, or do you already, incorporate your music into the work you are doing at VECTOR Gallery?

JJ:  I sometimes play the harmonium in the space, and occasionally a theremin.  Someday I will record an album there.

SL: At the moment all of your work is electronic in nature. Do you have any plans to experiment with other types of music? Live instruments, etc?

JJ:  Yes, with an instrument that hasn’t been invented yet, that plays the scales of the sonic equivalent to antimatter, becoming matter.  Antisound as it becomes sound and vice-versa.  VOOV.

SL: What initially inspired you to create the LaBianca’s, a Charles Manson concept band? Do you believe that Charles Manson is a political prisoner?

JJ:  Manson is free in His mind. I only really “discovered” Him a few years ago, and for a time it was a private preoccupation.  I mentioned it to Lena soon after we met, and I found out that her boyfriend at the time had been reading Helter Skelter to her before bed… The LaBiancas resulted as the “logical” conclusion to a sequential procession of suspicious synchronicities.  

SL: Do you have an opinion on the recent decision to grant former Manson Family member Bruce Davis parole?

JJ:  Either too many opinions, or too few.  They amount to the same thing.

SL: How do you see the music of JJ Brine evolving in the near future?

JJ:  The music of JJ Brine might be released under all sorts of names, given and taken, one in the same.  But ultimately, the sound of ALAN as ALAN begins will harmonize with the sound of ALAN as ALAN ends until it is all one song, a single note that plays like a lullaby for a civilization that never existed, the same one that keeps me awake at night with its relentless insistence that I must be the scribe to pen a comprehensive account of its rich and varied traditions.  Perhaps then I would get some rest.

You can Visit JJ at

Vector Gallery

40 Clinton Street

NYC, NY 10002

And listen to JJ’s “The President of Mozabique” and the LaBianca’s “Charles Manson is Jesus Chris on iTunes or Soundcloud

Interview by Summer Swann

(via vectorgallery)

28
Mar
nxmxgxldxx:

Vector Mass (3)
#3 x #3 x #3
 9-10pm : No speaking! Communication via symbols/gestures only. 10pm-∞ : Tongues can come untied. The Mass begins. We have an announcement to make, but we can’t say it until we complete our vow of silence. Sermons by: JJ Brine Lena Marquise ノーム ゴールディ Montgomery Harris Danielle - Draik Aubrey M Loftus



Here :: An Invitation Extended from The Vector Gallery, and Eye Thee Minister Ov Death. We wish Yu join us Saturday, March 29th for a moment ov utter silence, symbols, and suggestibility, ƒollowed by the unraveling oƒ speech.



- NOME, M.O.D.

nxmxgxldxx:

Vector Mass (3)

#3 x #3 x #3


9-10pm : No speaking! Communication via symbols/gestures only.

10pm-∞ : Tongues can come untied. The Mass begins.

We have an announcement to make, but we can’t say it until we complete our vow of silence.

Sermons by:

JJ Brine
Lena Marquise
ノーム ゴールディ
Montgomery Harris
Danielle - Draik
Aubrey M Loftus
Here :: An Invitation Extended from The Vector Gallery, and Eye Thee Minister Ov Death. We wish Yu join us Saturday, March 29th for a moment ov utter silence, symbols, and suggestibility, ƒollowed by the unraveling oƒ speech.
- NOME, M.O.D.

DRUGLORD RECORDS

A brand new NY-based record label featuring JJ Brine, President of Mozambique and The LaBiancas

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